Labiaplasty: all your questions answered!

Written by: Dr Alexander Bader
Published: | Updated: 29/01/2019
Edited by: Cal Murphy

If you have heard of cosmetic procedures on the genitals, such as labiaplasty and full vaginoplasty, you probably have several questions. You may be asking why get a labiaplasty, why it is performed, and what happens if it goes wrong. Top cosmetic gynaecologist Dr Alexander Bader is here to provide the answers to the top questions people have about labiaplasty.

What are the top reasons for getting a labiaplasty?

Labiaplasty is often considered a cosmetic procedure, but in reality, this is not the only reason why it is done. Labiaplasty is performed on patients because the large volume, or bulginess in that area often bothers the patients, as it may affect the functionality of their labia, and they may experience difficulties in sexual intercourse, doing sports, and even performing everyday activities.

As well as functional reasons, labiaplasty is performed for aesthetic reasons. Many patients are bothered by the length of the tissue in that area, or they have been born with a malformation with an asymmetrical shape, which also makes them self-conscious and bothered by the appearance of that area. This can have a serious impact on their lives.

 

Can labiaplasty go wrong?

Like any other surgical procedure, labiaplasty can sometimes go wrong. But, as professionals, we have to investigate why it went wrong. Usually, it goes wrong for one of two reasons—either because of the surgeon’s mistake or because of the patient’s mistake. When it comes to the surgeon’s mistake, it comes from an unskilled surgeon or a surgeon who has not had sufficient training. When somebody wants to undergo labiaplasty, she should go and find a well-skilled and trained surgeon. When it comes to the patient’s side, the patients need to follow instructions. After finishing the procedure, as surgeons, we give them instructions to follow, which they definitely need to follow in order to avoid any kind of complications.

 

How much does a labiaplasty cost?

Labiaplasty, as a surgical procedure, involves different expenses that should be considered by the patient. That will include hospital fees, anaesthesiology fees, and, of course, the surgeon’s fees as well. I can’t give you a definite answer here – it depends on the patient’s case, how long the patient needs to stay in hospital, and how long the surgery itself will take in the surgical room. But on average, a labiaplasty procedure would cost somewhere between £2,500 and upwards. This price would include all the previous expenses, as mentioned above—clinic, anaesthesiology, and surgeon fees. Usually, in our clinic, we include all post-operative follow-ups with the patients.

By Dr Alexander Bader
Obstetrics & gynaecology

Dr Bader is an internationally renowned specialist OB/GYN and cosmetic gynaecologist who pioneered cosmetic vaginal surgery (CVS) in Europe. Dr Bader is the first doctor on the continent to exclusively practice cosmetic vaginal surgery. He is a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS), the American Academy of Cosmetic Gynaecologists (AAOCG), and the International Society of Cosmetogynecology (ISG). He is regularly invited to lecture and teach at international meetings in cosmetic surgery. His exclusive involvement with reconstructive and cosmetic vaginal surgery for the last decade affords him the opportunity to deal with a large volume of interesting and complex cases on a daily basis. Dr. Bader frequently conducts hands-on training courses and holds the position of President of The European Society of Aesthetic Gynaecology (ESAG) and The World Academy of Cosmetic & Aesthetic Gynecology (WACAG). He leads a large number of enthusiastic doctors from all over the world who want be positively involved with this innovative field. Dr Bader is the director of HB Health Cosmetic Gynaecology Centre in London. He divides his time between London and Dubai, where he is a visiting surgeon in several prestigious clinics and hospitals.

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