Nasal endoscopy

Specialty of Otolaryngology / ENT

What is a nasal endoscopy?

A nasal endoscopy is a multifunctional exploratory procedure performed at the otorhinolaryngologist’s clinic to examine the nose, neck and larynx. It is carried out using a flexible fibre-optic instrument with a cold light source, a camera and a monitor. This allows for an easy and direct exploration of cavities in the body that are normally difficult to see.

What does a nasal endoscopy involve?

A nasal endoscopy is performed using a flexible fibre optic tube which is inserted through the nose. The procedure lasts approximately three minutes and is performed at the clinic. Local anaesthetic may or may not be used, depending on the case.

Why is a nasal endoscopy performed?

It is performed to diagnose respiratory tract pathologies or dysfunctions. The procedure allows images and video to be obtained, which is useful for explaining to the person the nature of their pathology. It also allows the specialist to keep a visual record, which helps them evaluate the pathology and its evolution over time, and the effectiveness of the applied treatments.

Preparing for a nasal endoscopy:

No prior preparation is required. You only need to follow the specialist’s instructions and they will indicate any procedures that need to follow. Only in some cases will local anaesthetic be applied to the nostril through which the fibrescope is inserted (deviation of the nasal septum or a nasal pathology).

What does it feel like during a nasal endoscopy?

It can be a bit uncomfortable, because a foreign body being inserted into your nose. So, a little anaesthetic may be necessary in some cases.

Meaning of abnormal results:

This is a quick and effective technique for detecting pathologies or dysfunctions in these structures. Any abnormality can be easily spotted and subsequently treated by the specialist.

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